F1 22 Mexico Setups

The best F1 22 Mexico setups | Fastest race setups, time trial setups & wet weather setups

F1 22 Mexico Setups

Below are all of our F1 22 Mexico Setups for both dry and wet conditions. These include race and time trial setups.

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Mexico F1 22 Setup

Mexico is another recent addition to the Formula 1 22 calendar and has held some pretty fun races over the past few years. The Mexico F1 22 circuit is a fast and fun track to drive. It features a few long straights, a series of fast corners that are very similar to those found around Silverstone. And in the final sector, there is a slow technical stadium section.

All of these elements have to be taken into account when creating our F1 22 Mexico setup. You’ll need a predominantly low downforce setup to allow you to compete for overtakes along the long pit straight. However you’ll need a little bit of downforce at the front of the car to allow you to turn the car quickly into the slower technical corners of sector 3.

Aerodynamic setup

While you will want to prioritise a low downforce car setup for Mexico in F1 22, you will need a good front end. You’ll want to run higher front aero compared to rear. This will help reduce understeer into a lot of the corners. The first sector consists of some slow to medium speed 90 degree turns that will punish a car with low front downforce.

While the middle sector rewards a stable car as you throw yourself through the fast sweeping turns. Finally, the last sector features the slowest corners on the track. And these will again punish you if you lack front end downforce.

By increasing your front aero compared to your rear, your car will feel slightly lighter at the rear, but more responsive at the front. This will allow you to get the nose turned into these corners efficiently. Other than the few turns through the second sector, you won’t require too much rear downforce balance. This will allow you to lower your rear aero, allowing for increased top speed.

Differential setup

Mexico is a rear limited track. This refers to the rear of your car being the limiting factor in your overall speed. You will require a lot of rear traction to help launch yourself out of the slower corners around Mexico in F1 22. And this takes its toll on your tyre wear throughout a race.

One way to slightly counteract the loss of tyre wear is by lowering your on-throttle differential setup. This will lessen the chance of your rear tyres breaking traction under acceleration. Lowering your on-throttle diff is a very effective way of helping to manage rear tyre wear, especially through a full race distance.

Around Mexico, you may also want to lower your off-throttle diff setup. This will help rotate your car better at lower speeds. This can help you run a lower front wing aero setup to aid top speed. If you lower your front wing aero, you can also lower your off-diff setup. This will go some way to help counteract the loss of front downforce.

Mexico suspension setup

Mexico is a pretty flat circuit and it’s a track that isn’t too hard on your tyres in terms of tyre wear in F1 22. This allows us to run a more aggressive suspension geometry setup. Increasing your camber will help with mid-corner speed as you will have more grip when you’re leaning on your tyres through a corner. This will especially help through the fast middle sector.

Increasing your toe will allow your car to be much more responsive. Your car will respond better to steering inputs. Increased toe angle will however cause excess drag along the long straight, which in turn will reduce your top speed.

In terms of your suspension, despite being relatively flat, there are a fair few kerbs around Mexico. These kerbs aren’t huge but can cause disruption to your car’s balance as you drive over them. And Mexico is all about pushing the boundary of the track to maximise your lap time.

Run with a soft suspension setup to allow your car the flexibility of attacking the kerbs without being penalised with a lack of stability. You can also run relatively soft anti-roll bars as there aren’t too many fast corners. Do keep your anti-roll bars a little stiffer than your suspension setup though to help with a little bit of side to side rigidity.

With your ride height, go pretty low at the front and slightly higher at the rear. This high rake mentality will help during corner entry, making it easier to turn your car.

Brake and tyre setup

In F1 22 Mexico is a track with a few heavy braking zones. You have the first corner where you’ll be braking from high speed and a few other heavy braking zones throughout the lap. This means you should look to increase your brake pressure close to 100%.

For your brake bias setup, you can keep this balanced. Throughout a lap of Mexico in F1 22, you’ll be braking while applying some steering lock, so a balanced brake bias is just right.

Due to the lack of too much tyre degradation around Mexico, you can keep your tyre pressure setup reasonably balanced too. This will give you the best of both worlds, decent tyre life throughout a full race, and good responsiveness from the tyres.